How To Treat Dental Instruments Right

Dental instruments are the tools that dental professionals use to provide dental treatment. They include tools to examine, manipulate, restore and remove teeth and surrounding oral structures. Standard instruments are the instruments used to examine, restore and extract teeth and manipulate tissues.

 
When a Dental Instrument is not sharpened properly it can cause the hygienist to use too much pressure. This can lead to discomfort for the hygienist and the patient. There is also the danger of the instrument slipping. If your instruments are worn too thin, breakage of the instrument may be the result.
 
Dental Burs cutting surface are either made of a multifluted tungsten carbide, a diamond coated tip or a stainless steel multi fluted rosehead. There are many different types and classifications of burs some of the most common are: the round bur (sizes ¼ to 10) or inverted cone (sizes 33½ to 90L). Burs are also classified by the type of shank. For instance a latch type, or right angle bur is only used in the slow speed dental handpiece with contra-angle attachment. Long shank or shaft is only used in the slow speed when the contra-angle is not in use, and finally a friction grip bur which is a small bur used only in the high-speed handpiece. There are many bur shapes that are utilized in various specific procedures.
 
Many of you sharpen your own instruments. Most use a stone. Here are some tips to help you save money. Look at the blade under light, if it reflects light it needs sharpened. While there are no set rules on how often you should sharpen this is what I have found to be true. Sharpen your instruments after each use or at least the very first sign of going dull. If you do this you will take off less metal and the instruments will last longer. Next most people who use a stone will put on a different edge each time. It is almost impossible to get the perfect edge consistently. I recommend sending your instruments to a professional sharpener every two or three months depending on how much you use them. Your sharpener has equipment that can put the exact angle on the instrument and re-tip as needed.
 
Cleaning by hand can be dangerous, so it is best to use an ultrasonic machine. Some times you may not be able to use the ultrasonic immediately after use. When this happens I would recommend setting up a pre-soak until you can clean them properly. This will prevent drying and corrosion and supplement the cleaning process. I recommend the use of an enzymatic low suds solution for pre-soak and ultrasonic cleaning.
 
Many of you sharpen your own instruments. Most use a stone. Here are some tips to help you save money. Look at the blade under light, if it reflects light it needs sharpened. While there are no set rules on how often you should sharpen this is what I have found to be true. Sharpen your instruments after each use or at least the very first sign of going dull. If you do this you will take off less metal and the instruments will last longer. Next most people who use a stone will put on a different edge each time. It is almost impossible to get the perfect edge consistently. I recommend sending your instruments to a professional sharpener every two or three months depending on how much you use them. Your sharpener has equipment that can put the exact angle on the instrument and re-tip as needed.
 
 

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