What Should We Do When Teeth Broken?

If you broken tooth you’ll want to see your dentist as soon as possible. Your dentist will need to determine if tooth break was caused by decay and if the nerve is in danger. Adults with a damaged nerve usually will require root canal treatment, but in children, there’s a possibility the nerve can be saved if the dentist is able to treat the problem immediately.

 

There is no way to treat a cracked tooth at home. You need to see your dentist. Sometimes the tooth looks fine, but it hurts only when you eat or when the temperature in your mouth changes (because you drank something hot or cold, for example). If your tooth hurts all the time, it may have a damaged nerve or blood vessels. This is a serious warning sign.

 

These breaks affect the pointed chewing surfaces (the cusps) of the teeth. They usually do not affect the pulp and are unlikely to cause much pain. Your dentist may repair the damage to restore the tooth's shape. Frequently, however, an onlay or crown will be required.

 

Your dentist can determine if a cavity has caused or exacerbated the break, and treat the decay before it spreads further. He or she can also diagnose any damage to the nerve inside your tooth, damage that will require more severe treatment and cause you great pain if ignored.

 

If you have a broken tooth, see your dentist as soon as possible. Your dentist can figure out if the break was caused by cavities, and if the tooth's nerve is in danger. A damaged nerve usually will require root canal treatment.

 

As you can see, fixes for broken teeth run the gamut from a quick polish to root canal to extraction. As you might imagine, there is a very wide spectrum of prices you could pay for various treatments. A quick polish and filing may only cost you a few extra dollars, while other procedures could easily the thousand-dollar threshold if you do not have dental coverage.

 

The dentist will prepare the tooth to the ideal shape for the crown. This will mean removing most of the outer surface, and leaving a strong inner ‘core’. The amount of the tooth removed will be the same as the thickness of the crown to be fitted. Once the tooth is shaped, the dentist will take an impression of the prepared tooth, one of the opposite jaw and possibly another to mark the way you bite together. The impressions will be given to the technician, along with any other information they need to make the crown.

 

If root canal endodontic is not completely broken down, it may be possible to build it up again using filling material. This ‘core’ is then prepared in the same way as a natural tooth and the impressions are taken.

 

If you are in pain from a broken tooth, cracked or chipped tooth, you may want to take an over-the-counter pain reliever or self-made toothache remedy. If you have a minor chip in your tooth, there’s no need to panic. You’re not in any danger of losing your tooth. Also, if possible, keep any part of the tooth that has broken off and take this with you to the dentist.

 

After discussing several choices of procedures and materials that could be used, the patient elected to have a combination of new porcelain crowns and a custom partial denture. Dr. Richard incorporated a Bredent attachment device made of resilient material which eliminates the unsightly metal clasps that are typically used with partials.

 

Teeth are among the most distinctive (and long-lasting) features of mammal species. Paleontologists use teeth to identify fossil species and determine their relationships. The shape of the animal's teeth are related to its diet. For example, plant matter is hard to digest, so herbivores have many molars for chewing and grinding. Carnivores, on the other hand, need canines  to kill prey and to tear meat.

 

Find more dental supplies and dental handpiece on ishinerdental.com.

 

 


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