There Is A Good Chance Tooth Whitening Is Effective

Many teeth whitening systems are available, including whitening toothpastes, over-the-counter gels, rinses, strips, and trays, and whitening agents obtained from a dentist.
 
Teeth whitening is ideal for people who have healthy, unrestored teeth (no fillings) and gums. Individuals with yellow tones to their teeth respond best. But this cosmetic procedure is not recommended for everyone.
 
Whitening Toothpastes
 
All toothpastes help remove surface stains because they contain mild abrasives. Some whitening toothpastes contain gentle polishing or chemical agents that provide additional stain removal effectiveness. Whitening toothpastes can help remove surface stains only and do not contain bleach; over-the-counter and professional whitening products contain carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide that helps lighten the color deep in the tooth. Whitening toothpastes can lighten your tooth's color by about one shade. In contrast, light-activated whitening conducted in your dentist's office can make your teeth three to eight shades lighter.
 
Over-the-Counter Whitening Strips and Gels
 
Whitening gels are clear, peroxide-based gels applied with a small brush directly to the surface of your teeth. Instructions generally call for twice a day application for 14 days. Initial results are seen in a few days and final results are sustained for about four months. Whitening strips are very thin, virtually invisible strips that are coated with a peroxide-based whitening gel. The strips are applied twice daily for 30 minutes for 14 days. Initial results are seen in a few days and final results are sustained for about four months.
 
If you're tempted to pick up one of those tooth-whitening products at the drugstore or dentist's office, rest assured: a new review of existing research suggests there's a good chance they're effective.
 
"All the products seem to work," said Dr. Hana Hasson, clinical associate professor at the University of Michigan and lead author of the review. "They were dependable in terms of effects and safety."
 
But Hasson and colleagues don't consider the studies in favor of the products to be rock-solid, and they couldn't find evidence supporting anything other than short-term use.
 
Tooth-whitening products started to become popular in the 1990s, and their appeal has grown mightily over the past decade. Now, store shelves are filled with tooth-whitening products, all claiming to brighten smiles.
 
The products bleach the teeth with chemicals - instead of cleaning them with abrasives - and are designed to be used only for a couple weeks at a time.
 
You can find more dental supplies for sale and dental lab equipment at ishinerdental.com.
 

Looking for more dental equipment at ishinerdental.com.
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