A Little-known Fluid Produced In Tiny Amounts In The Gums

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms drinking excessive fluids, dry mouth, excessive mouth watering and increased speech volume including Dehydration (Children), Dehydration (Adult), and Teething.
 
There are 21 conditions associated with drinking excessive fluids, dry mouth, excessive mouth watering and increased speech volume. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions.
 
Dehydration (Children)
Dehydration, or not getting enough fluid, causes dry and sticky mouth, tearless crying, and more in children.
 
Dehydration (Adult)
Dehydration, or not getting enough fluid, causes low blood pressure, weakness, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea.
 
Teething
Teething can cause crankiness, fussing, biting on objects, swollen gums, and drooling in infants.
 
Diabetes, type 2
Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision.
 
Diabetes, type 1
Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision.
 
A little-known fluid produced in tiny amounts in the gums, those tough pink tissues that hold the teeth in place, has become a hot topic for scientists trying to develop an early, non-invasive test for gum disease, the No. 1 cause of tooth loss in adults. It's not saliva, a quart of which people produce each day, but gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), produced at the rate of millionths of a quart per tooth.
 
The study, the most comprehensive analysis of GCF to date, appears in ACS' monthly Journal of Proteome Research.
 
Eric Reynolds and colleagues note that GCF accumulates at sites of inflammation in the crevice between teeth and gums. Since dental workers can easily collect the fluid from patients, GCF has become a prime candidate for a simple inexpensive test to distinguish mild gum disease from the serious form that leads to tooth loss. But researchers have little information about the chemical composition of GCF.
 
The scientists collected GCF samples from 12 patients with a history of gum disease. Using high-tech dental instruments, they identified 66 proteins, 43 of which they found in the fluid for the first time. The fluid contained proteins from several sources, including bacteria and the breakdown products of gum tissue and bone, they note. They also identified antibacterial substances involved in fighting infection.
 
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